Their Idea Is ‘Da Bomb’: Three High School Seniors Are Building Bath Bomb Business in Their Parents’ Basement

Their Idea Is ‘Da Bomb’: Three High School Seniors Are Building Bath Bomb Business in Their Parents’ Basement

DETROIT LAKES, Minn. — How many times have you thought of a great idea, the next best invention, and said, “I should make that” but then just let it fall by the wayside and never got around to it?

Well, three Detroit Lakes High School seniors didn’t let their brainchild go — they had an idea, and they made the leap — no fears of failure — just an idea they thought would be fun.

It started with a need for a gift. One of the high schoolers, Isaac Eggebraaten, was trying to decide what to get his girlfriend for Christmas, and bath bombs came to mind.

On the way to the store with two of his closest friends, Gabe Anderson and Jacob Hanson, the guys realized bath bombs wouldn’t be so difficult to make themselves, so they started spitballing.

“I just kind of started thinking maybe this would be a good idea to sell, and we just kind of built off each other,” said Anderson. “In the end, we decided to start a business.”

After getting the word out that they were thinking about making bath bombs, Hanson says a lot of their fellow classmates sounded interested: “Some of the girls in school, when we told them we were doing it, they’re like, ‘Wow—I’d love to buy those.’

With the buyers at the ready, they made the time, putting an emphasis on really creating a good product.

“We’re not some company that manufactures thousands of these a day,” said Hanson. “We make a handful a day, so we like to make them personal and have meaning behind it other than just buying our product.”

The guys went to the drawing board, testing out different bath bomb recipes and perfecting their very own concoction.

“Our feet are eternally soft now,” said Anderson, laughing about how many recipes they tested.

More than just the product, they also wanted to focus on the presentation, making their packaging as aesthetically pleasing as possible and even going the extra mile, adding positive messages inside the boxes.

“We spent a lot of time on packaging,” said Anderson.

With a bomb product, it wasn’t hard for their business to take off. Eggebraaten says they’ve sold about 200 since getting up and running in early Dec. — and now they’re even an official business in the eyes of the Secretary of State.

It’s safe to say these bombs have exploded.

“We’ve slowly taken over Isaac’s basement with this,” said Anderson with a laugh. “So there’s a small operation there.”

“Yeah, small operation,” joked Eggebraaten. “My entire basement smells like lavender.”

But no one seems to mind—basements have smelled worse.

“My mom loves it,” said Eggebraaten. “That’s the only reason she lets us do it.”

But, while it’s a business, and it has taken off thanks to their twitter handle, @YOUDABOMBBATH and word of mouth at the high school, the guys still think of it as something “fun.”

They’re busy high school seniors with jobs and extracurriculars, so they think of the bath bomb business as a great way for them to spend time together before going their separate ways after graduation.

“We can all go hang out and work at the same time,” said Anderson.

“It’s kind of a fun task that we’re doing, too,” added Hanson. “It’s something that we enjoy doing.”

Being that they have seen such success, Eggebraaten, Hanson, and Anderson, will be presenting their business at the Economic Summit at M State on Friday, March 3.

“We present in the morning. It’s a pretty big deal,” said Eggebraaten, excited to have not only the school’s support but the support of the community and business owners therein. “It should be a good experience for us.”

Click to add a comment

Leave a Reply


More in Stories

Two ND Women Named 2018 Bush Fellows

Angie WeickMarch 22, 2018

Branching Out: Friends Stick With What They Know Best to Grow Buffalo Coulee Sawmill Business

Janelle VonasekMarch 7, 2018

Economist Gives Fargo Audience Glimpse Into Trump’s World

Dave OlsonFebruary 21, 2018

Minnesota Solar Jobs Jumped 48 Percent Last Year: U.S. Industry Sees First Decline Since 2010 as Minnesota Approaches 1,000 Megawatts

April BaumgartenFebruary 14, 2018

Grand Forks Lost Most Construction Jobs in the U.S. Last Year

April BaumgartenFebruary 7, 2018

Law Grads in N.D., S.D. and Minn. See Good Opportunities, Comparatively Low Debt

Tom Dennis - Forum News ServiceJanuary 23, 2018

Gander Outdoors to Reopen Five Stores in Minn., but Fargo Store Won’t

Ross TorgersonJanuary 4, 2018

Moorhead Native’s Bitcoin Brilliance Propels Him Onto Prestigious Forbes ‘30 Under 30’ List

Ross TorgersonDecember 20, 2017

Covering Costs: How We Pay for Care Evolving Balance Between Public and Private Payments

Sam EasterDecember 13, 2017

Copyright © 2015 | Forum Communications Company

Skip to toolbar